Institute Events and Trainings
Institute on Disabilities at Temple University

EDUCATION

Spring 2015 Mini Course/Lecture Series on Disabilities

The Institute on Disabilities at Temple University hosts guest speakers and lecturers several times each year for its Mini Course/Lecture Series on Disabilities. Experts in a wide variety of fields including Disability Studies, Assistive Technology, Leadership Development, and Social Policy present lectures and programs to students, parents, teachers and other professionals in the field of disabilities.

 Multimedia archive of the Lecture Series
Listen to or view select presenters from past Mini Course Lecture Series events. Not all lectures are included in the archive.

Upcoming This Spring: Events in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh

March 19 - Supported Decision-Making and the Human Right of Legal Capacity

Presented by Kristin Booth Glen
Supported Decision-Making - jump to details


April 27 - Cultural and Linguistic Competence: What Does it Mean for Disability Services and Supports

Presented by Tawara D. Goode, MA
Role of Cultural and Linguistic Competence - jump to details


May 3 - "When I Walk" Film Screening and Panel Discussion

Filmmaker Jason DaSilva's chronicle of his journey after Multiple Sclerosis diagnosis.
When I Walk - jump to details


March 19, 2015
Supported Decision-Making and the Human Right of Legal Capacity


PHOTO: Kristin Booth Glen
Presented by
Kristin Booth Glen


Professor and Dean Emerita, City University of New York School of Law


Date/Time/Location

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 2015
9:30 AM - NOON (Registration begins at 8:30 AM)
Registration is recommended.

Community Behavioral Health
801 Market Street
11th Floor, Room 1154-A
Philadelphia, PA 19107


About the Presentation

Guardianship is the means by which the state (through a court) gives one person, the guardian, the power to make decision FOR another. But making our own decisions is a fundamental part of who we are as persons, and taking that ability away is a profound deprivation. The emerging human right of legal capacity challenges the necessity of guardianship, and its adoption in 150 countries around the world provides a vision and opportunity for change that promotes and ensures dignity and equality for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Co-Sponsors: Vision for Equality, The Alliance of Community Service Providers, and Pennsylvania Develpmental Disabilities Council.

About the Presenter

Over almost 50 years as a lawyer, Kristin Booth Glen has been an activist for the rights of women, communities of color, the LGBT community, incarcerated persons, older persons, and most recently, persons with disabilities, especially intellectual, developmental and psycho-social disabilities, as well as a judge and a legal educator. A former surrogate judge in New York County, Ms. Glen has chaired the American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging, served as a Commissioner on the Disability Rights Commission, and is currently a Board member of the Center for Human Rights, and writes and lectures widely on human rights and legal capacity.


Registerfor the March 19 Mini Course Lecture


More information

  • Act 48 credits available.
  • Social Work CEs are available.
  • This event is FREE.
  • Registration is recommended.
  • Requests for accommodations must submitted by March 5, 2015.

April 27, 2015
Cultural and Linguistic Competence: What Does it Mean for Disability Services and Supports


PHOTO: Tawara Goode
Presented by
Tawara D. Goode, MA


Director, National Center for Cultural Competence; Associate Director, Georgetown University Center for Child & Human Development; Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University Medical Center


Date/Time/Location

MONDAY, APRIL 27, 2015
9:30 AM - NOON (Registration begins at 8:30 AM)
Registration is recommended.

Crowne Plaza, Philadelphia West
4010 City Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19131
www.cpphilawest.com


About the Presentation

Cultural and linguistic competence (CLC) is widely recognized by policy makers, researchers, educators, and providers as fundamental aspects of quality in human services. CLC is viewed as an essential approach for reducing disparities by improving access to, utilization of, and outcomes for this nation's diverse communities across service sectors. While the evidence suggests the efficacy of this approach, many continue to struggle with the full integration of CLC into human services, health, and education systems. This lecture will describe: (1) conceptual frameworks for advancing cultural and linguistic competence, at both the organizational and individual levels, across systems of services and supports for people with developmental and other disabilities; and (2) cite lessons of the journey to advance and sustain these efforts systemically.

Co-Sponsors: Vision for Equality, The Alliance of Community Service Providers, and the Pennsylvania Developmental Disabilities Council.

About the Presenter

Tawara Goode is recognized as a thought leader in the area of cultural and linguistic competency and has built the National Center for Cultural Competence into an internationally recognized program. She an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Georgetown University Medical Center and has been on the faculty of the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development (GUCCHD), for the past 30 years.


Register for the April 28 Mini Course Lecture


More information

  • Act 48 credits available.
  • This event is FREE.
  • Registration is recommended.
  • Requests for accommodations must submitted by April 14, 2015.

May 3, 2015
"When I Walk" Film Screening and Panel Discussion


PHOTO: Jason DaSilva holding video camera
A film by
Jason DaSilva


Filmmaker, Producer, Director


Date/Time/Location

SUNDAY, May 3, 2015
3 PM - 5:30 PM (Registration begins at 2:30 PM)
Registration is recommended.

CLASS
1400 S. Braddock Ave.,
Pittsburgh, PA


About the Presentation

VILLAGE VOICE CRITICS' PICK: "Absorbing and moving!" –Ernest Hardy, Village Voice

"Extraordinarily accomplished, poignant, and wise." –Inkoo Kang, Los Angeles Times

"An unflinching portrait of DaSilva's physical deterioration suffused with his contagious fortitude and resilient spirit." –Nate von Zumwalt, Sundance Institute

"When I Walk" is an autobiographical chronicle of filmmaker Jason DaSilva's journey after his diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. Following the screening a panel will discuss various aspects of the film. Light refreshments will be served.

To view a trailer of the film: www.wheniwalk.com

Co-Sponsors: Community Living and Support Services—CLASS, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Pittsburgh Reelabilities, The Alliance of Community Service Providers, ADA25, Disability Rights Network, FISA Foundation, PA Developmental Disabilities Council, and MSWorld.org

About Jason DaSilva

Mr. DaSilva has been a prolific filmmaker, directing four short films: OLIVIA'S PUZZLE, premiered at the 2003 Sundance Festival and qualified for an Academy Award; A SONG FOR DANIEL; TWINS OF MANKALA; and FIRST STEPS; and two feature-length documentary films: LEST WE FORGET and WHEN I WALK. Three of his films have had national broadcasts on PBS, HBO, and CBC. He also produced "Shocking and Awful," a film installation on the anti-Iraq war movement, exhibited at the 2006 Whitney Biennial.

Jason earned a Masters in Fine Arts in Applied Media Arts from Emily Carr University.


Register for the May 3 Mini Course Lecture


More information

  • This event is FREE.
  • Registration is recommended.
  • Requests for accommodations must submitted by April 21, 2015.
  • Act 48 credits available.
  • Permission to grant Social Work CEs has been requested.

The Mini Course Lecture Series is a program of the Institute on Disabilities at Temple University.